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University of Connecticut
INTEGRATED 
PEST MANAGEMENT

University of Connecticut
INTEGRATED
PEST MANAGEMENT

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WHAT'S NEW
Employment Opportunities
Reports & Success Stories
GDD Accumulation 2009-2010
GDD for Insect Management

PROGRAM AREAS

Field Corn/Forage IPM
Greenhouse IPM
IPM for Home Grounds
Nursery IPM
IPM for Small Fruit
IPM for Tree Fruit
Grape IPM
Turfgrass IPM
Vegetable IPM
Weed IPM
General IPM
Insects/Vertebrates
IPM for Schools
Purple Loosestrife

IPM EDUCATION
Financial Incentives for IPM Adoption
IPM Publications 
Educational Opportunities

IPM Curriculum for CT Schools
IPM Homestudy Courses
Index of IPM Articles
IPM Links

Search our Site
Feedback
Privacy Policy

PEOPLE
IPM Contacts
IPM Employment Opportunities
IPM email



WEBMASTER
Marilyn S. Chase

UCONN LINKS[dogpaw]
UConn IPM Main Page
UConn CANR
UConn Coop.Extension

   Farm Risk Management Prog.    
   Water Quality & The Home  Landscape

UConn Home & Garden Ctr.
UConn Main Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 






BEETLE FARMER NEWS!
[Picture] Jsnuary 2009

  Grape IPM pest message
 
 

Sign up for the Beetle Farmer List Serve

 

 
 
 
   
   IPM Curriculum for Connecticut Schools
 In the News
July 2008
   
Integrated pest management (IPM) is a sustainable approach to managing pests. IPM practitioners base decisions on information that is collected systematically as they integrate economic, environmental, and social goals. IPM applies to any situation, agricultural or urban, and is flexible enough to accommodate the changing demands of agriculture, commerce, and society.
IPM emphasizes the integration of many pest suppression technologies:
  • Biological control--beneficial organisms that manage pests.
  • Cultural control--crop rotation, sanitation, and other practices that reduce pest problems.
  • Mechanical and physical controls--for example, traps, cultivation, and temperature modification.
  • Chemical control--judicious use of pesticides and other chemicals.
  • Genetic control (host plant resistance)--traditional selective breeding and newer biotechnology that produce pest-resistant crop varieties.
  • Regulatory control--state and federal regulations that prevent the spread of pest organisms.

IPM Strategies

Our IPM sites for Field Corn, Greenhouse, Nursery, Small Fruit, Tree Fruit, Grapes, Turf, Vegetables and Weeds Programs are designed to provide information to growers and commercial interests.  

Homeowners may find the sites made for growers useful for pest identification, but control methods are often not available to, nor practical for, homeowners. Our Homegrounds IPM site provides information directed to homeowners.  

Our General site provides information, such as beneficial insects and animal pests, which can be useful to growers and homeowners.

Try our IPM crossword puzzle, just for fun! 
Please send comments about the website to webmaster:
Marilyn S. Chase
marilyn.chase@uconn.edu

Please send pest management questions to:
ipm@uconn.edu

for more information about IPM programs, contact
Ana Legrand, Ph.D., IPM Programs Coordinator
University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, Department of Plant Science
telephone: (860) 486-
0869
Search our site

IPM Links

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  Watch For These New Pest Concerns